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Momentum is Fleeting

Doors opened. Conversations happened. Approving nods all around. Emails flew about.   Lunches, then dinner some nights. People showed up and stayed. You soaked it all in, counted your cards, dreamt of what could be next. 
It was a grand time.

After the break, silence. Doors closed. Conversations stopped. No meetings, no nods. Emails dried up. Bag lunch, leftovers. Nobody showed up. You soaked it all in, no cards to count, wondering if this is how it all falls apart.

Momentum is fleeting. Don't take it for granted. Those balls you were juggling are now hanging in the air all by themselves, stuck in the magic of the moment. The magic leaves, the balls fall down. And you pick 'em back up again and try to remember how you made it happen.

When you know there's momentum, seize it. Carpe diem. Hoo-rah. Hop on the desk. Make your stand. Round everyone up and ask them to join you. Sign 'em up. Take pictures. Slap backs. Share apples. High fives all around. Keep that momentum go…

Holding Ourselves Accountable

Sometimes I fall short.

I'll say I'm going to do something, intend to do it, and simply forget. Or push my time too far, so whatever it is I committedto gets delayed. You might do this too, or people you know do it and you get shorted.

I experience it frequently enough it makes me question whether we need a better way for making simple day to day agreements and holding ourselves accountable.

It's simple to me: if you say you're going to do something, or open to doing something, and don't follow through--either through a mistake or with intent--you haven't met your commitment. The gap between what you say you're going to do and what you actually deliver is in some ways a measure of your integrity. Even the little things.

Most people don't mean to blow past commitments. Life catches up with us. Too busy. Overcommitted. I don't like that term because it implies there's dedication, yet if you get dropped as part of the overcommitment it's an ex…

Strong Opinions, Strongly Held

I really like smart, polite people who mean well. I've heard the phrase from a number of smart polite people that they believe in the phrase, "strong views (or opinions), weakly held." 
When I first heard that I nodded in agreement and considered its wisdom. It implies a willingness to cooperate, to not be blinded by your own beliefs to the detriment of progress. 
And I'm sure it works in certain groups---collaborators working on improving the status quo--in certain situations. And yet it can sound like "yeah I have a strong opinion about this, but I don't really care that much about the outcome." 
There's another group of people--a smaller group, I'd bet. These people have strong opinions, strongly held. 
Steve Jobs didn't hold his strong opinions weakly. Nor did MLK. Nor did Sara Blakely, the now-billionaire founder of Spanx. Nor did John Lennon, or Basquiat, or Miles Davis. 
Weakly held opinions lead to weak outcomes, the muzak of outcomes…

Search & Privacy

I've been using DuckDuckGo.com (DDG) for search recently instead of Google because of its privacy features--it doesn't track you or store your searches. And generally I find it to be useful, delivering relevant content better than or equal to Google's relatively commercial content.

When I want to shop for something, I go to Google because it's a strong engine for that--it's a commerce discovery platform when it comes down to it. Or Amazon.

DDG doesn't track anything, which is meaningful these days when every site and likely every agency tracks what you're doing.

I still think there's a space for curated search, which is what I attempted to do with the unfortunately named Jawaya, a social search or curated search engine of sorts. And I've been building a similar tool for myself as a side project that will approximate that. It's much more powerful with a network of people curating search results. So I might open it up at some point to see if that …

Self-Sustaining, Regenerative Tech Ecosystems

This is a repost from 2011. As I'm diving back into tech, it feels like a good time to revisit this as I'm now based in the MidWest, which, quite broadly, sports a lot of tech companies and some interdependent ecosystems.

The capital for startups is here, but I'm at the beginning of a raise and am not sure if it's like Central Pa capital--slow, small amounts at low valuations--or competitive with NYC and the Valley.

* unfortunately we lost comments from the original post when I disabled Disqus a few years ago, from Arnold Waldstein, Brad Feld, and a few others. Brad referenced it in one of his posts on startup ecosystems. 

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This post is conjecture from my observations and personal experience, without citations, and was about software ecosystems, though it could be applied to other sectors

For as long as I've been in tech I've heard the term "ecosystem" applied by people in regions outside of the Silicon Valley tech ecosystem t…

2020: When the EV Breaks Out

EVs make up a relatively tiny part of US auto sales, but the Tesla 3 outsold all other luxury cars and almost outsold the Toyota Corolla. It's still too pricey, but it's coming down this summer and there's a new, lower-cost model on the way.

More Affordable
GM's Bolt EV gets about 240 miles of range, and costs about $36,000 before incentives, which total $9,000 (including rebates in some states) until April, when the federal incentive is cut in half. It's a great car, but for me the seat isn't comfortable.  The range is enough to allay your range anxiety; you can drive from Lancaster to NYC and back without recharging, depending on how you drive. You can charge while you're there in one of the hundreds of charging stations, many of which are in parking garages.

New and Interesting
Hyundai is coming out with the Kona, which has a range of about 240 miles; it's like the Honda HRV, a small crossover with a good amount of space relative to the Bolt (guessing)…

Return to Tech or Stay in Social Impact?

One of the decisions I've put off is whether to stay in the social impact world or return to tech.

Some might argue there's an intersection between the two, but I haven't seen much of it around the issue I care most about, which is poverty and the unfairness of extractive industries. I'm talking about excessive, escalating fines for anything from parking tickets to court costs, or bank fees, or cash checking, or Rent-a-Center, etc, etc.

I'm thinking a lot about that, but haven't found the angle just yet. Payday lending is top of mind; even the framing of that practice is unjust: employees work, then wait one to two weeks for a paycheck. They're basically lending money to the employer, who pays them without interest down the road. In the meantime there are bills to pay.

So it's really a line of credit they're giving to the employer--the employee is the lender, and the employer is the borrower. There's something to that. An employer will argue the…